Progressives will save the GOP

For one, the wealthy targets of their anti-bank, anticorporation, and anti-union policies are revolting. The top 1 percent, people who hire, people who invest, and people who donate millions to charity, are sick and tired of being excoriated simply by virtue of their success. It might have been hard to defend wealth during Occupy Wall Street, but that party’s over and an election is on the horizon. Wall Street in particular is getting more and more comfortable telling the Democrats where to go.

Obama floated a budget plan to raise taxes on Wall Street, but, as Politico put it, “no one took it seriously.” And, “just days later, the President was raising money at the home of one of the wealthiest private equity executives in New York.”

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo also dashed de Blasio’s hopes of raising taxes on the wealthy, who oppose his fight against charter schools.

Even Hillary Clinton, the Democrats’ presumptive presidential nominee, seems to know where her bread is buttered, giving two big-money speeches to Goldman Sachs last year alone, in which she promised the group she had no plans to bash the banks.

Progressivism is, in essence, dividing the Democratic Party down the middle.