Breaking with GOP, California Republicans tout immigration reform

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce spent $300,000 on television ads in Valadao’s district, noting that he is the son of immigrants. Denham highlights an award he received from the nation’s largest Latino advocacy group for “putting sound immigration policy over party politics.” He was the first Republican co-sponsor of a sweeping immigration bill now stalled in the House.

“People have seen I’ve shown real leadership in driving this issue forward,” Denham said.

Sounding a lot like Democrats, some Republican members of California’s congressional delegation are making the case that changing the law is necessary to help farmers and businesses and to keep families together. But they also are members of a party that has stifled immigration-overhaul efforts, providing a political opening for Democrats in a state where immigrants are a crucial underpinning of the economy.