Why public opinion of ObamaCare remains negative

“People’s opinions are pretty set, and so divided by political party, that we think people are still judging the law through their partisan lens,” said Liz Hamel, director of the foundation’s public opinion and survey research. “Eight million is a lot of people, but in terms of the share reporting on public opinion of the law, it’s a small share.”

Over time, public opinion has remained steady, with the exception of a bump in the number holding negative views after October’s messy launch of HealthCare.gov. It’ll take time for sentiments to change as consumers use their new coverage, but for Obamacare to see positive ratings, Hamel said, people will also have to like that coverage.

Misinformation may also be the culprit behind the health law’s low approval ratings. Some 57 percent of respondents said the Obama administration fell short of its enrollment goal, despite reports that health coverage sign-ups surpassed 8 million, far and above the Congressional Budget Office’s 7 million estimate (and revised 6 million projection, following the tech troubles of the first two months of open enrollment).