The true opponents of immigration reform

Already we can see immigration compromises evaporating. While many conservatives are now willing to allow working foreign nationals to remain in the country while seeking legal citizenship, many liberals are against finishing the promised border fence. They do not wish to deport those who have committed a felony or a serious offense such as driving under the influence. Indeed, some liberal politicians are already horse-trading to allow two or more such crimes before deportation.

They also want to grant amnesties to those who are not working and are on public assistance — despite the common assurance that all foreign nationals supposedly came to the U.S. only to work.

So far, La Raza activists and Democratic operatives do not seem eager to divorce immigration policy from ethnic considerations and preferences. They do not support the idea that all potential legal immigrants be judged equally on criteria such as job skills or education that ensure those living abroad a fair shot at immigrating and more likely a smoother transition to profitable U.S. citizenship.

Instead, “comprehensive immigration reform” is shaping up as little more than another divisive campaign opportunity in 2014 to call opponents all sorts of names rather than to seek real compromise.