Midterm blues for Democrats: Rebuking the "new" New Deal

Obama’s standing with all of these groups has dropped considerably since the square-wheeled “rollout” of Obamacare. A slim majority of young people and women don’t approve of his performance. As for independents, the key group for midterm elections, only 35 percent approve of his “handling his job as president,” according to a recent Quinnipiac University poll. Fifty-three percent don’t believe he is honest and trustworthy.

Imagine how they’ll feel when they’re notified that their insurance premiums (and deductibles) are going up and their doctor is no longer available. On the very off chance that they won’t know who to blame, all they’ll need to do is turn on the TV, which will be blaring ads showing their Democratic congressman or senator parroting Obama’s lie that Obamacare will save you money and that you can keep your insurance and your doctor if you like them.

Like the president himself, Obama’s fans have an unshakable faith in his ability to move the electorate to his side. And while it’s obviously true that he’s been good at getting himself elected, he’s inversely successful at getting anyone else elected, which is why Senators Mary Landrieu (D., La.) and Kay Hagan (D., N.C.) chose not to appear with Obama during his recent visits to their states.