Happy Weinerversary: The lessons of Weinergate

I shouted in the airport and fist-pumped my arm like a piston. New media had once again bested traditional media and forced them to examine the story with honest eyes. Business Insider called it “Andrew Breitbart’s most famous moment.”

Weiner’s arrogance–as demonstrated by his hostility towards CNN’s Dana Bash–only contributed to the speed with which he fell. In the weeks that followed there was much speculation from conspiracy theorists who, in their irrational anger and political prejudice, thought us hackers–despite Wiener admitting that he uploaded all the photos himself, conversed with a woman in Seattle, was sorry he did it, sorry he falsely accused others, and sorry for what he’d done to his wife.

The story proved how the left refused to hold themselves to the same standard they’d set for conservatives. We refused them the yoke of zero accountability. We didn’t go to the mainstream press to break the story; we bypassed them to break it ourselves. Citizen journalists made it news to the point where the mainstream press was forced to cover it.

That’s the legacy of Andrew Breitbart.