Who's most likely to fall for online scams? Hint: Not grandma and grandpa

The study even waded into political territory, finding that Republicans and Democrats were about equally likely to be victims, while members of some “alternative” parties, like the Tea Party or the Green Party, rated better. Independents were found to the most vulnerable.

The most susceptible target victim of all is a woman between 18 and 25, who lives in the Southwest, earns between $25,000 and $50,000 and doesn’t hold a high school degree, the study says. The most scam-proof demographic are is males aged 56 to 65 who’ve earned an advanced degree, live in the Midwest and earn between $150,000 and $200,000.

The study asked participants to rate how likely they were to fall for various scams, and also how likely they felt others in their demographic were to fall victim. Perhaps the most interesting finding in the study is how critical Americans are of other Americans’ critical thinking. In every category, Americans thought their compatriots were much more likely to fall for scams than Brits or Australians thought their countrymen to be. Sixty-two percent of Americans, for example, believed other Americans would give a scammer their credit card number in exchange for a get-rich-quick opportunity, compared to just 43 percent of Australians.