"It’s almost as though there was a part of Bill Clinton that he had no control over"

“You’ve got to understand, at one time there was at least 25 women per day coming through there trying to find him,” says Paul Fray, Clinton’s campaign manager during his unsuccessful congressional run in 1974. “I’d tell them he’s on the road, get out the door. But, Lord, it was bad, bad, bad, bad, bad, bad.”

“He draws women in and they are literally mesmerized by this man,” said Marla Crider, a congressional campaign aide to Clinton. “It was absolutely like fly on honey. And he needed that. He needed that kind of adoration.”

The Lewinsky scandal occupies a nearly 40-minute stretch towards the end of the film, and is largely used as the coda to Clinton’s time in office.

“There were almost these sparks flying between them from that first moment when they saw each other,” said Ken Gormley, a law professor at Duquesne University and the author of “The Death of American Virtue: Clinton vs. Starr.”

“It’s almost as though there was a part of Bill Clinton that he had no control over,” said William Chafe, a history professor at Duke University.