"It sounds to me that y'all ought to be joining us"

By the end, the Occupy Memphis members and their audience — made up mostly of whites over 40 years old — reached common ground on some issues, such as their perception that the government and politicians no longer listen to and serve the people they represent.

They also found some agreement in their stances against taxpayer-sponsored government bailouts and “crony capitalism,” the idea that close ties between lobbyists, businesses, and other self-serving interests can influence government officials and the exercise of capitalism.

“We all want the same form of government, which is one that listens to its constituents,” said Tran, a business and American history student who said he served in Iraq in 2009 and 2010 with the Army.

But some disagreements also emerged.

Tea Party members expressed frustration with big, intrusive government, while the Occupy Memphis speakers opposed what they perceive as the corporate world’s manipulative influence on government policy.