"If Facebook could ... topple the Egyptian government, then perhaps Herman Cain can use it to win Iowa"

“Message is more important than money,” Cain boomed to reporters gathered at the New Hampshire state capitol last week. “Mr. Perry and Mr. Romney spent a lot of money trying to influence the outcome of that straw poll. We rented a bus and drove around the state delivering a message of common-sense solutions. And it worked. And you’re going to see that same bus right here in New Hampshire.”…

There’s also little evidence that Cain is turning to nontraditional organizational tools to keep his momentum going. He has more than 270,000 followers on Facebook and about 119,000 on Twitter, but these numbers are in the ballpark, and in some cases lower, than those of his leading rivals. In other words, if Cain has the potential to foment a social-networking revolution as an alternative to traditional organizing, it hasn’t started yet.

Rich Killion, a longtime Republican strategist in New Hampshire, home of the nation’s first primary, said he has seen no evidence of a Cain organization since the campaign lost its grass-roots director, Matt Murphy, over the summer…

“Organization does matter,” Killion said. “Organization captures openings, opportunities, and harnesses momentum into action, which helps you build and follow up and create an operation on the ground with people who are your activists and evangelists and your inspiration for others to get involved. It means a lot in New Hampshire.”