Black Lives Matter activists want investigation of leader after real-estate binge

If there’s one thing that unites activists the political left and the political right, it’s … grift. From ultra-nationalists to Marxists, eventually someone figures out how to use organizing to get rich. This time around it’s the turn of Black Lives Matter activists, who are shocked, shocked to find their founder and leader Patrisse Khan-Cullors buying up high-end real estate with seven-figure price tags:

As protests broke out across the country in the name of Black Lives Matter, the group’s co-founder went on a real estate-buying binge, snagging four high-end homes for $3.2 million in the US alone, according to property records.

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, 37, also eyed property in the Bahamas at an ultra-exclusive resort where Justin Timberlake and Tiger Woods both have homes, The Post has learned. Luxury apartments and townhouses at the beachfront Albany resort outside Nassau are priced between $5 million and $20 million, according to a local agent.

The self-described Marxist last month purchased a $1.4 million home on a secluded road a short drive from Malibu in Los Angeles, according to a report. The 2,370 square-foot property features “soaring ceilings, skylights and plenty of windows” with canyon views. The Topanga Canyon homestead, which includes two houses on a quarter acre, is just one of three homes Khan-Cullors owns in the Los Angeles area, public records show.

This started off with the discovery last week that Khan-Cullors had bought a pricey “mini-compound” in Topanga Canyon, a part of Los Angeles that is far from the “struggle.” She purchased the quarter-acre site with two dwellings from an unnamed corporation for a cool $1.4 million, which isn’t exactly a redistribution of the wealth:

A secluded mini-compound tucked into L.A.’s rustic and semi-remote Topanga Canyon was recently sold for a tad more than $1.4 million to a corporate entity that public records show is controlled by Patrisse Khan-Cullors, 37-year-old social justice visionary and co-founder of the galvanizing and, for some, controversial Black Lives Matter movement. …

A winding 15 minute drive from The Commons at Calabasas and a slightly longer and somewat less serpentine drive from Malibu’s Getty Villa, the pint-sized compound spans about one-quarter of an acre. The property’s not-quite 2,400 square feet is divided between the a three-bedroom and two-bath main house and a separate one-bed/one-bath apartment capable of hosting guests long term with a private entry and a living room with kitchenette.

It sounds like a nice place to live, and $1.4 million isn’t exactly a surprising amount for a property in that area of Los Angeles. If she got the cash from the book, no one would question it, but that kind of money is unusual from book sales, even from a prominent figure in the news. However, the scope of Khan-Cullors’ real-estate “binge” has BLM activists demanding an independent investigation into the group’s finances:

Hawk Newsome, the head of Black Lives Matter Greater New York City, called for “an independent investigation” to find out how the global network spends its money.

“If you go around calling yourself a socialist, you have to ask how much of her own personal money is going to charitable causes,” he said. “It’s really sad because it makes people doubt the validity of the movement and overlook the fact that it’s the people that carry this movement.”

If you go around calling yourself a socialist, you probably shouldn’t keep snapping up personal property in the form of real estate. (One could ask Bernie Sanders about that, too.) Socialists oppose personal property, especially in the form of real estate, and especially when the wealthy collect more of it than they can use at any one time. Investments in real estate are usually the hallmark of capitalists, and occasionally grifters as well.

So which is Khan-Cullors? We’ll see what she has to say about her investment portfolio, assuming she answers these questions at all. In the meantime, perhaps the rest of the world will take a step back from BLM and perform the due diligence that they should have exercised about it from the beginning. That’s a lesson that people across the political spectrum need to keep relearning, not just the Left.