Tuesday night some activists with a group called Extinction Rebellion blocked the entrances to the underground shuttle in the U.S. Capitol. They did it with glue. Human beings glued themselves together to get out their message to members of Congress – pass the resolution declaring a climate emergency and demand the resources to combat the impact of climate change.

Members of Extinction Rebellion used Gorilla Glue to glue themselves together to block the entrances from the Cannon and Rayburn House office buildings to the Capitol as members were on the move for a 6:30 P.M. vote. Why didn’t they just form a chain and stand in front of the entrances without the glue stunt? The action of gluing themselves together is silly dramatics.

The Extinction Rebellion protesters want to advance a resolution introduced by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Rep. Earl Blumenauer, along with Sen. Bernie Sanders. They are particularly worried about drought, coral systems, and climate change refugees. Maybe they thought the answer to their concerns was in a bottle of glue.

The protesters wanted to disrupt the vote schedule until their demands were heard and agreed upon. They posted their plan on their website.

Extinction Rebellion wrote in its website: “This evening, July 23, we are significantly disrupting business-as-usual to force Congress to take the climate emergency seriously. The power of the people of the world, rising up in unison to shake off the broken systems that are leading us to destruction, is the only thing that can save us from climate catastrophe.”

Kaela Bamberger, media coordinator for Extinction Rebellion, said the protest was to encourage Congress to find that there is a climate emergency requiring “a massive-scale mobilization.”

As it turns out, it is a crime to protest on Capitol grounds. Seventeen protesters were arrested.

The lawmakers were able to continue on with their business as scheduled by simply taking a different route. One lawmaker voiced the same reaction I initially had to this story – how can anyone expect to be taken seriously while pulling such a dumb stunt? Well, the lawmaker posed the question a little more diplomatically.

Bamberger, the media coordinator said that the idea is to get Congress to follow the path taken by the U.K. Excuse me, but the United States doesn’t “follow” the U.K. We fought a war over that, you know.

“Part of the protest is to force the U.S. to consider following in the U.K.’s footsteps of declaring a climate emergency,” said Kaela Bamberger, a media representative for Extinction Rebellion. “Part of the point in using civil disobedience is creating this situation where we disrupt business as usual for congresspeople and put pressure on Congress to demand a climate emergency and to see that resolution through the legislature.”

In April, protesters in London closed down the Waterloo Bridge for more than a week. They glued themselves to buildings and climbed on top of trains. Mayor of London Sadiq Khan agreed to meet with some members of Extinction Rebellion’s U.K. division. Who knew this group is an international group?

Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, met with the protesters and promised to consider a citizens’ assembly on climate change. Additionally, on May 1, in accordance with one of their demands, U.K. Parliament members declared a climate and environment emergency, becoming the first national legislature to do so.

Maxine Waters was down for the cause. Because of course she was. She wasn’t so supportive that she glued herself to someone in the protest but supportive enough to get herself into the story. She’s not new here.

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., encouraged the Rayburn protesters after encountering them by the entrance.

“What’s the word?” she asked them, to which they shouted “climate change” in unison. “Say it louder,” she said — which they did — then offered them a shout of encouragement before walking off.

The environmental extremists need not worry with the Democrats in control of the House. An initiative was introduced by the House Energy and Commerce Committee Tuesday. Perhaps the protesters weren’t kept abreast of the committee’s work.

The initiative, named 100by50, aims to switch the U.S. to a 100 percent clean energy economy by 2050. Rep. Paul Tonko rolled out a list of hearing topics related to this climate initiative, from reducing industrial emissions to modernizing the electric grid.

There you go. Someone should alert the glue people.