Earlier this month, Oracle decided it would hold its Open World convention to Las Vegas instead of San Francisco. An email explaining the company’s decision cited the high cost of hotel rooms and San Francisco’s poor street conditions:

“Oracle stated that their attendee feedback was that San Francisco hotel rates are too high,” the email, which was viewed by CNBC, said. “Poor street conditions was another reason why they made this difficult decision.”

The SFTA, a private nonprofit organization that promotes San Francisco tourism, said it’s issuing a cancellation bulletin, covering five days and over 62,000 room nights in October 2020, October 2021 and September 2022.

“The estimated economic impact of each of the above is $64,000,000, a huge loss for our city,” the email said.

This isn’t the first time San Francisco has lost a major convention because of the condition of the city’s streets. Last year a major medical convention expected to spend around $40 million canceled and announced they would be holding their event in Los Angeles. You can imagine how bad things have to be for the streets of LA to seem like an improvement.

San Francisco is a filthy mess but it’s not for lack of trying to keep it clean. The San Francisco Chronicle’s Phil Matier pointed out yesterday that the city currently spends about a quarter million dollars per day on street cleaning:

Between street sweeping crews, staffed portable toilets and sidewalk steamers, San Francisco spent $94 million — or about $257,534 a day this year — trying to keep the city clean. And while progress has been made, the effort remains a losing battle.

The years of trench warfare between cleanup crews and bad actors was laid out clearly in two images Monday.

The first image was of Mayor London Breed flanked by city, civic and tourist industry leaders standing together in front of the giant Christmas tree at Union Square. The intent was to reassure tourists that the city is taking seriously concerns about its squalid streets and people behaving badly.

While that was happening an image of a man with his pants around his knees defecating in a Marina Safeway aisle was rocketing around the internet and TV.

Here’s the tweet he’s referring to:

Can you imagine being the minimum wage worker who had to clean up this mess? Someone looking to offer an excuse for this behavior asked if the bathrooms at this store were locked:

This is the side of homelessness that the activists don’t want the public to see or discuss. The story the activists have been telling for years is that the homeless are just regular people who lost their homes because of high rents. But what the public actually encounters on the streets are people with drug problems and mental problems, many of whom couldn’t keep an apartment or hold down a job no matter how cheap.