When Bernie Sanders came out it took three full minutes for the crowd to calm down enough for him to finally start his speech. He spent the next four minutes thanking everyone from his donors to his delegates.

“I understand that many people here in this convention hall and around the country are disappointed about the final results of the nominating process,” Sanders said adding, “I think it’s fair to say that no one is more disappointed than I am.”

Sanders went in to a list of concerns about economic and social justice, saying the revolution started by his campaign “continues.” “And I look forward to being part of that struggle with you,” he added.

Sanders then said the election had never been about himself or Hillary or any of the other candidates but was about, “the needs of the American people and the kind of future we create for our children and our grandchildren.”

Midway in to the speech, Sanders turned to the kind of leadership that unified rather than divided. He concluded, “By these measures, any objective observer will conclude that based on her ideas and her leadership Hillary Clinton must become the next President of the United States.”

Sanders spent much of the rest of the speech on his usual issues including raising the minimum wage, overturning Citizens United, free tuition, health care and climate change. If you’ve listened to Sanders’ stump speeches, this was a repackaged version attacking Trump’s position on these issues and praising Clinton’s.

Near the end of this speech Sanders said his agenda, which had become party of the party platform, needed to be enacted by a Democratic Senate, House and by Hillary Clinton in the White House. “And I am going to do all I can to make that happen,” he said. He concluded, “Hillary Clinton will make an outstanding president and I am proud to stand with her tonight.”

It wasn’t an especially well-crafted or delivered speech, but I suppose it got the job done as a hand-off to Hillary.