An annual report issued last month by the German equivalent of the FBI indicates that Iran is still seeking to acquire illegal nuclear and missile technology. The Jerusalem Post reports:

Germany’s  intelligence agency, the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, said in the report, that Iran’s “illegal proliferation-sensitive procurement activities in Germany registered by the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution persisted in 2015 at what is, even by international standards, a quantitatively high level. This holds true in particular with regard to items which can be used in the field of nuclear technology.”

The report noted “a further increase in the already considerable procurement efforts in connection with Iran’s ambitious missile technology program which could, among other things, potentially serve to deliver nuclear weapons. Against this backdrop it is safe to expect that Iran will continue it sensitive procurement activities in Germany using clandestine methods to achieve its objectives.”

Fox News has a bit more on those “clandestine methods.” The report notes there are already hundreds of people living in Germany who have some association with Iranian-backed terrorist groups:

In addition, the report identified more than 1,000 associates of Iranian-backed terror groups living in Germany, including some 950 Hezbollah members and supporters, as well as 300 Hamas members. The report implied that some of these individuals could be inside Germany working on behalf of Iran and other terror-sponsoring states.

“The followers of Islamist-terrorist groups like Hamas and Hezbollah striving for the abolition of the Jewish State of Israel are focused on their regions of origin, which is where they commit most of their terrorist acts of violence,” the report said.

In March Reuters reported that Iran’s missile tests were in violation of U.N. resolution 2231, though not the Iran deal itself. Resolution 2231 called on Iran to stop tests of missiles capable of carrying a nuclear weapon. Iran has argued that the missiles are defensive in nature and not intended to carry nuclear weapons.