We haven’t touched on this topic in a while, but in my desperate search to find some news (any news!) not having to do with the you-know-what, I ran across this interesting item. A physicist from the University of Albany and a former scientist for NASA, Kevin Knuth, was interviewed about his recent work involving unidentified aerospace phenomena (UAPs, or UFOs as I still insist on calling them). He shares a number of his thoughts about the subject, including the work he’s been doing analyzing the performance data of the objects seen in the Navy UFO videos that we’ve discussed here previously.

Given the data showing that the objects can accelerate almost instantly, at roughly 5,000 times the base acceleration rate of gravity, the idea that we’re observing some sort of conventional advancement of current human technology is highly unlikely. Knuth says he isn’t completely “married” to the idea that these are definitely extraterrestrial in nature. That’s one possibility, but there’s another one out there worth considering. These might have been built by humans after all, just not humans that most of us are aware of. (Altamont Enterprise, emphasis added)

Before the coronavirus hit, Knuth was scheduled to give a lecture at the Carey Institute for Global Good in Rensselaerville, where he would have presented the findings of his most recent study into the acceleration patterns of some of these unidentified crafts, which he says are up to 5,000 times the acceleration of gravity and indicate an unnatural, and inhuman, origin.

“That is the data,” Knuth said. “Now the trick is looking for an explanation.”

Knuth said that he’s not entirely married to the concept of these sightings as evidence of extraterrestrial life, acknowledging that there are two working hypotheses that he entertains while approaching each incident. One is that the encounters are perpetrated by extraterrestrials. The other, known as the “Wakanda hypothesis” in reference to the eponymous fictional kingdom in the Black Panther comic series, considers the possibility of an Earth-based civilization that has “extreme technology,” Knuth said.

“For me, it suggests that we missed some physics somewhere,” Knuth said on how he reconciles the still relatively unpopular field of UFO research with more mainstream branches of science.

Knuth isn’t just looking at the subject from his chalkboard at the university. He’s now a member of UAP eXpeditions, which we’ve discussed here previously. That means he’s working alongside the likes of Kevin Day (who was present at the USS Nimitz UFO incident) and quantum physicist Deep Prasad, who talked to us about UAP eXpeditions last year.

Later this spring, the group will be taking two ships out in the Pacific off the coast of southern California and Mexico and running tests to attempt to detect the presence of UFOs in the region. But how does the currently available data about the tic-tacs and orbs line up with the idea that these could be the property of human beings not associated with any terrestrial governments that we’re aware of?

This is the stuff of some real flights of fancy, but since everyone is on lockdown anyway, we might as well bat it around. Some of the folks in the ufology field are convinced of the realities of UFOs, but still believe that the vastness of space makes it unlikely that any other species would be able to reach us. I don’t tend to agree, but I suppose it’s still a plausible argument to put forward. So if the technology didn’t come from “somewhere else” but it also wasn’t cooked up by the United States, the Russians or the Chinese, who does that leave?

How about a conspiracy theory concept that’s been around for a long time? Maybe they were created by a breakaway civilization. It’s the idea that at some point in the past, a group of humans left the fold of humanity and went… somewhere else. (The most common proposition is that they went underground.) And there, they began developing amazing technologies in secret and raced ahead of the rest of us.

Before your eyes glaze over entirely, as I mentioned above, I’m not a proponent of this theory, though I find it highly entertaining. But here’s one thought to chew on that could tie the reports of the Nimitz encounters to this idea. If the UAPs keep showing up off the coast of southern California, is it possible that their owners have a base in the area? That would certainly be more convenient than having to commute back and forth between Earth and the Sirius star system, right? But how could there be such an advanced, technological base here on Earth without us having discovered it? Well… what if it’s underwater? Like way underwater.

It’s regularly been noted that we know more about the surface of Mars now than we do about the deeper bits of the ocean floor. And in the tale of David Fravor’s account of his encounter with the tic-tac, the full reports indicated that the craft (or one very like it) emerged from the water before it started flitting around in the sky. A second report claimed (I can’t verify this one yet) that one of our submarines operating in the area at the time, possible as part of the same training exercise, reported an underwater contact moving at unbelievable speeds on sonar. If we’re to accept that these things are real and they wanted to stay out of sight, a hole in the ocean floor might be a perfect choice, no?

As I said, this is mostly just a flight of fancy to entertain ourselves until UAP eXpedtiions finish their work and (hopefully) finds something. But if you don’t believe that these things were built by extraterrestrials and you don’t like the breakaway civilization theory, what’s left? I think at that point we’re down to time-traveling humans coming back to check on us from the distant future. Of course, if that’s the case, it’s still good news because it means that we eventually survive the thing I promised not to mention in this article. Stay safe out there, folks. (I mean, of course, safe from alien abductions.)