The outcome of next month’s parliamentary elections in the constituency of Batley and Spen, northeast of Manchester, England, probably aren’t of all that much interest to you unless you happen to live in the region. But that particular race has been drawing plenty of attention in the past few days for a rather unusual reason. The Brexit Party had nominated author and “wealth mentor” Jill J.J. Hughes as their candidate for MP and things appeared to be going well enough for a while. But that’s when some oppo research emerged and created a stir.

It turns out that Hughes is an alien. I did some checking and it turns out that the requirements for being a Member of Parliament are that you must be 18 years old and a citizen of a British commonwealth, country or the Republic of Ireland. Fair enough. If she’s not a citizen, she can’t be elected so they’ll need to find a new candidate.

But it turns out that Hughs isn’t that kind of alien. By her own admission, she’s from a planet in the star system of Sirius. This is an excerpt from the author’s bio in one of her novels.

“To this day J.J.Hughes believes in elves/fairies/mermaids/unicorns and all things Elemental and Other Worldly…She has had numerous prophetic premonitions – usually about death, which so far despite a few close shaves she has escaped. She came to believe in reincarnation in her mid-twenties when her old horse Red made a re-appearance, this time as a palomino called Hooray Henry.”

Come on, man. Who among us hasn’t had a horse be reincarnated as… um, another horse? But as Paul Seaburn at Mysterious Universe discovered, the story grew more convoluted.

However, a little more digging into Hughes’ past by the anti-right campaign group Hope Not Hate uncovered a quote by Hughes on a website for “Energy Healers, Lightworkers, Starseeds and anyone going through the ascension process healers.”

“I have just come to truly realise that my purpose is to raise consciousness here on earth – I originated from Sirius.”

That’s Sirius the star, not the satellite radio service, which only offends people unhappy with their monthly fees.

As Paul goes on to point out, additional research revealed some very interesting opinions in her other published work. In one instance, she claimed that aliens are already among us, many of whom are “less than Apple Pie wholesome or Positive pumpkins,” are working with various world Governments. But the details of such alien governmental interactions are “all hush-hush for now.”

The question hanging over all of this is why Hughes succumbed to the pressure and dropped out of the race. She was the nominee and if she believes in aliens, she should just own it and walk the walk, right? I mean, we now live in an era after the United States government as much as admitted we’ve got UFOs zipping around our carrier battle groups. That’s not a disqualifier unless the voters in Batley and Spen say it is. Heck, we’ve had politicians here in the United States who believed in UFOs and/or aliens. In fact, we nearly had a member of Congress who claimed to have been abducted by aliens and stayed in touch with them telepathically.

Not being a Brit myself, I don’t have a dog in this race and have no say in who they elect. But just as a casual Yankee observer, I think that constituency race next month will be much poorer for the lack of Ms. Hughes.