The Big Apple is visited regularly by politicians of both parties looking to score some serious campaign cash. Small wonder, since it’s the home of Wall Street and some of the wealthiest and most politically active people in the country. But it’s not just the big-dollar donors who are of interest to politicians. Even the humble employees of the municipal government get in on the campaign contribution action and those small-dollar donations can add up quickly.

2019 is no exception and the New York Post reports that these city employees have been breaking open their piggy banks and sending in cash to many of the Democratic hopefuls. But there’s one conspicuous name almost entirely missing from the list. Almost nobody is interested in sending any of their hard-earned cash to their own mayor.

Nearly 3,000 municipal workers, including several in City Hall, have collectively coughed up more than $200,000 to White House aspirants, but almost all of it went to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s rivals, data shows.

A review of data compiled by the nonprofit Center for Public Integrity — which looked at small-dollar donations made through the ActBlue fundraising Web site between January 1 and June 30 — reveals Hizzoner’s lack of financial support in his own backyard.

Of 2,923 donors who self-identified their employer as “NYC,” “City of New York” or “New York City” on their ActBlue profiles, only 74 of them — or about 2.5 percent — gave to de Blasio.

Only 74 people out of almost three thousand New York City municipal workers bothered to send any money to de Blasio. That’s got to be depressing. He got less money than Biden, Sanders, Warren, Harris and even Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

The quotes from a few of the donors who were contacted seemed to bear out the perception that de Blasio’s approval numbers in his own city have tanked. And even the ones who do like him would prefer that he stay home and do his job rather than chasing a brass ring that he’ll never catch. In short, Hizzoner’s campaign is viewed as a joke, even on his home turf.

One nagging question does arise from this report, however. They were listing a lot of donors who gave amounts well below the threshold requiring they be reported to the FCC. According to the article, the research relied on details provided from ActBlue and included information from the donors’ profiles on that site. ActBlue is a clearinghouse for liberal donations. Did they consult all of these donors before releasing their information for this report?

Some people only give a small amount because they can’t afford any more. But others make sure to donate less than $200 precisely so their names won’t show up on such reports. If ActBlue reserves the right to publish everyone’s donations in their terms of service, then I suppose it’s fine and the blame lands on the shoulders of the donor for not reading the details. But if they don’t, somebody might want to look into this in terms of privacy violations.