Will she or won’t she? That’s the big question about Ghislaine Maxwell after her indictment for sex trafficking, abuse, and perjury, but it’s really two questions. Will she cooperate in going after Jeffrey Epstein’s other enablers and co-abusers? More urgently, though, will she survive long enough to cooperate?

The editors of the New York Post note the priorities here, and offer a unique solution. This time around, we can’t afford a suicide, so let’s put as many eyes on her as possible. In fact, let’s put all eyes on Maxwell:

Lock her in a glass cage.

Put a camera in the cell, hook it up to the internet, livestream it to the world.

Double the guard. Double their pay. Make sure they can’t be bribed, don’t sleep on the job, aren’t watching television.

Actually, the second idea makes more sense than the first or third, and a lot more sense than their next suggestion to keep Maxwell in a cage in Times Square. Why not put some cameras in that space and connect it up to the Internet? Other than privacy issues — not that Maxwell spent a lot of time worrying about that with the underage girls she recruited and exploited — this would be brilliant as a solution. Given the interest in this case, there wouldn’t be a single second of any day where Maxwell wasn’t being watched by someone on a streaming feed. If anyone attempted to harm Maxwell or if she attempted to harm herself, it would get immediate attention.

The Department of Justice could even operate it as a pay-per-view stream. The proceeds could go to the victims, or perhaps to upgrades at Metropolitan Correctional Center, where Epstein hung himself without interruption. Or didn’t, depending on your point of view. It’d be the ultimate in reality television, or at least participatory incarceration.

Of course, all this is really only worth the effort if Maxwell starts dropping dimes on the Lolita Express Frequent Fliers Club. Will she cooperate? Bet on it, says Epstein’s former partner and mentor, former fellow Ponzi schemer Steven Hoffenberg, and the man who should be most worried is Prince Andrew:

GHISLAINE Maxwell will be “fully cooperating” with the FBI in its child sex probe – and some of the world’s most powerful people, including Prince Andrew, may be “very worried,” Jeffrey Epstein’s former mentor has claimed. …

“Andrew handled it poorly, very poorly, he should have spoken to them through his lawyers, and given them some guidance.

“He should have given them something.

“She’s going to cooperate and be very important. Andrew may be very concerned, and there’s a lot of people very worried, a lot of powerful people been named [in the scandal], and she knows everything.

“She’ll totally cooperate.”

Andrew might be the least worried of all. His reputation is already in tatters, but he also has immunity from arrest and prosecution as long as he stays in the UK, effectively if not officially. The real risk is for those without royal privilege, especially the participants with American citizenship and residency.

But is Hoffenberg right? Perhaps, especially with Epstein out of the picture. He was her guarantor of security, and he managed to keep her safe the first time the government came after him. If the rich and powerful with whom she hobnobbed don’t help extricate her from this jam, one can expect that she won’t do time just to keep them safe. Those men should be scared, Maureen Callahan writes, and so should officials responsible for keeping Maxwell healthy:

Those other powerful men with ties to Epstein, Prince Andrew and Bill Clinton among them, would not impede a federal trial — and in fact, Epstein’s trial would mean more conspirators and participants would fall.

“They’re going to start digging into his life,” said Licata, “and start pulling out this spider web of people that were related to it.” …

Here’s a detail that should make prosecutors and prison guards nervous: In the recent Netflix documentary “Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich,” a survivor stands outside Epstein’s Manhattan townhouse and points to pockmarks in the edifice.

Such pockmarks, she says, were all over the interior. The entire house — every room, every bed, every bathroom, shower and toilet — was rigged with cameras and audio. Epstein kept a secret room full of monitors and watched his guests in real time. He blackmailed the powerful men who would visit and use his girls.

If Maxwell dies in custody, the federal government will take a hit from which it may never recover.

With all this going on, one has to wonder why Maxwell stuck around in the US herself. Over the past year, rumors put her in various places around the world, including a few where she would have remained out of reach of American law enforcement. Why blow a million dollars in cash to land in rural New Hampshire rather than a town house in the Seychelles or a ranch in Brazil?

Tucker Carlson wondered that too last night, and Alana Goodman didn’t have any answers. They do both agree, though, that Maxwell’s former Lolita Express friends had better start lining up their legal counsel — or tickets to non-extradition points unknown. Just for fun, Carlson names and shames a few of those pals, just to remind everyone of the stakes involved.