Maybe they need special bio-hazard suits, considering the mission Jeffrey Epstein had for his “ranch” in New Mexico. Still, as CBS News reported last night, it seems at least a little odd that federal investigators have not yet gotten around to raiding Epstein’s compound yet. According to at least a couple of victims, Epstein’s sex trafficking included his New Mexico mansion, and perhaps reached its bizarre nadir there:

State officials are sending the feds everything they have on the ranch in hopes of getting their attention, too:

Epstein accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre has said she was trafficked to the ranch as an underage sex slave, sharing photos of herself on the property taken when she was about 17. An accuser, identified as “Priscilla Doe” claimed in a new lawsuit Tuesday that Epstein coerced her to engage in sex acts there between 2007 and 2010.

It’s those alleged crimes that prompted State Land Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard to do something unusual for a land administrator: turn over more than 400 pages of records to state prosecutors probing those alleged crimes.

“I know that there are nominal cows that were run on this ranch. But no, it’s not your typical ranching operation in New Mexico,” she said. “I certainly think there was a veil of secrecy. Access to state land was very secure and prohibited almost.”

It was there that Epstein allegedly said he ”hoped to seed the human race with his DNA by impregnating women.” The ranch is the only Epstein property in the U.S. that has not yet been raided by federal agents. In the meantime, the state attorney general’s office said it will turn over any evidence to the Southern District of New York, which, despite Epstein’s death, is continuing the investigation into his possible co-conspirators.

That’s what makes the lack of a search somewhat mystifying. The longer that these residences remain accessible to Epstein’s staff, the more likely that they will be stripped of any evidence that might be used against them. Barr’s threat to go after “co-conspirators” would not go unnoticed among Epstein’s hired help in New Mexico, especially after Epstein’s suicide left them all holding the bag for their boss’ crimes.

Garcia Richard told CBS that the documents identify potential co-conspirators, which should make the property a key interest for federal investigators. She’s mystified by the apparent lack of action, too. Garcia Richard wants to send a message that New Mexico isn’t a place where elite pedos can just operate at whim … all evidence to the contrary so far:

“They name folks that were ranch managers, and so you just kind of wonder who knew what when at the time that these activities were taking place,” she said.

State property records newly obtained by CBS News show that in addition to a main house, Epstein’s property has a pool, firehouse, offices, a log cabin and guest house among other amenities. Garcia Richard said the property also features an airstrip, an antique railroad car and train tracks.

Epstein didn’t appear to have connections in New Mexico prior to purchasing Zorro Ranch. Asked what would draw him to the state, Garcia Richard said, “I think there’s a perception that people won’t ask questions … this case can really show the world that you can’t get away with things in New Mexico.”

Yes, well … on that note …

Epstein continued to notify law enforcement of his travels to the state anyway, CBS later learned, but that was entirely voluntary. Remember well that Alex Acosta’s smelly 2007 deal allowed that loophole to exist when he ignored younger victims to center the non-prosecution agreement on allegations made by a 16-year-old victim instead.

Still, everyone in New Mexico has been waiting for the feds to raid Epstein’s compound for weeks now. Garcia Richard insists that “there is a story to be told in New Mexico,” and local attorneys keep thinking a raid is imminent. Why didn’t it happen immediately after Epstein’s arrest?