How about Paul Ryan? (Too soon?) Looking past the nomination fight, Greta van Susteren asked Donald Trump about his search for a running mate, and the presumptive nominee told her that he’s down to “five to seven” possibilities. Two of them appear to be Republican governors in traditionally solid Republican states — and both women:

In an interview with Fox News’s “On the Record,” the GOP presumptive nominee was asked about Brewer saying that Fallin was on the list.

“Well, also Jan. Jan Brewer has been fantastic,” he said. “She has been so fantastic. You know I won so big, her territory, we won so big. And she is a fabulous woman. And I agree with you, the governor of Oklahoma, fabulous person.”

Seems like Chris Christie might have missed the short list. When asked, Trump replied that he didn’t want to put Christie “in there” as a VP candidate, but that he’s definitely on the team. Christie, a former prosecutor, could be less interested in the largely ceremonial position than in someplace where he could work aggressively — like, say, as Attorney General. Besides, what does putting another Northeastern Republican on the ticket do for Trump, other than have two people on it who are likely to lose their home states?

Both Brewer and Fallin have good track records with conservatives. Brewer famously fought Barack Obama over immigration, although Arizona didn’t end up on the winning end of that battle in the end. Brewer did back down on a religious freedom law, vetoing SB1062 in 2014 and ending up crosswise for a while with social conservatives. Fallin might come in with less baggage, but Trump might need to shore up the vote in Arizona, where his poor performance thus far among Hispanic voters in polls shows the normally solid-red state at risk in November. We won’t know until the convention, however; Trump wants to stick with the way the running mate has been “typically” announced, and there’s no real need to tee someone up for attacks earlier than that, now that Trump has solidified his nomination.

Perhaps more interesting in this exchange are Trump’s comments on executive orders. “We’re not going to do all of the executive orders,” Trump says, and “it would be nice to go back to the old-fashioned way of passing legislation.” However, he leaves open the possibility that he might be “forced” to govern by executive order — which is pretty much the same excuse Obama uses, too.