“Hopefully we can come together behind some package we can agree on in the next few weeks,” said Mitch McConnell on Friday about a new round of fiscal stimulus to replace the one that expires … in five days. Power players from both parties who are involved in deciding what that package will look like are the star guests on this morning’s Sunday shows. For Republicans it’ll be White House chief of staff Mark Meadows on “This Week,” top economic advisor Larry Kudlow on “State of the Union,” and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin on “Fox News Sunday.” Ted Cruz will also turn up on “Face the Nation” to defend his politically suicidal impulse to restore fiscal conservatism in the middle of a pandemic, at a moment when already record-setting weekly jobless claims have begun to rise again. Actually, I should say “politically homicidal”: Cruz himself will be just fine, it’s his party that’ll sustain a mortal wound if he gets his way.

For the Democrats, it’ll be Nancy Pelosi on “Face the Nation” and, well, that’s all. No other Democrat on the Hill matters right now. Why would anyone else be interviewed?

Elsewhere, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham will chat with “State of the Union” and “This Week,” respectively, about Trump’s plan to send federal agents to their jurisdictions to fight crime as part of Operation LeGend. Neither is enthusiastic about the plan, but Lightfoot has expressed some grudging willingness to give it a shot if the feds are true to their word about partnering with local police. What she and Grisham don’t want is a Portland-style campaign commercial in their backyards. Whether they get one anyway remains to be seen.

Last but not least, Dem Rep. Karen Bass will be on “State of the Union” to chat about her dark-horse candidacy for the Democratic VP slot. Bass was completely off the radar a few weeks ago but chatter has picked up about her and she has some supporters within the party. If you believe this site, Biden’s advisors have told people that the choice is down to her or Tammy Duckworth. If she’s the pick, her ascendance would be meteoric: She didn’t enter elected politics until she was over 50, when she joined California’s state assembly. Sixteen years later, she could soon be one very old heartbeat away from becoming America’s first woman (and second African-American) president. The full line-up is at the AP.