True enough, and thank goodness he decided to sound off about it today instead of waiting until tomorrow. The thought of him giving a national security exclusive to Joy Behar was simply … too much. Two quibbles with his point, though. One, like I said last night, while it’s old news to everyone who follows this subject that Pakistani intelligence is treacherous and filthy with jihad sympathizers, not everyone follows this subject. There’s bound to be more public pressure now on The One to do something about it. Which … may be a good thing:

Three administration officials separately expressed hope that they might be able to use the documents to gain leverage in efforts to get more help from Pakistan. Two of them raised the possibility of warning the Pakistanis that Congressional anger might threaten American aid.

“This is now out in the open,” a senior administration official said. “It’s reality now. In some ways, it makes it easier for us to tell the Pakistanis that they have to help us.”

Two, Wikileaks is still sitting on 15,000 documents so there may yet be a bombshell set to burst. In fact, I wonder if new media/liberal rock star Julian Assange purposely rolled out the weaker material to build buzz — for both himself and his “scoop” — with an eye to dropping the big one at just the right moment politically to maximize damage to the war effort. After all, this isn’t journalism, writes Andrew Exum, it’s activism:

Mr. Assange says he is a journalist, but he is not. He is an activist, and to what end it is not clear. This week — as when he released a video in April showing American helicopter gunships killing Iraqi civilians in 2007 — he has been throwing around the term “war crimes,” but offers no context for the events he is judging. It seems that the death of any civilian in war, an unavoidable occurrence, is a “crime.”

If his desire is to promote peace, Mr. Assange and his brand of activism are not as helpful as he imagines. By muddying the waters between journalism and activism, and by throwing his organization into the debate on Afghanistan with little apparent regard for the hard moral choices and dearth of good policy options facing decision-makers, he is being as reckless and destructive as the contemptible soldier or soldiers who leaked the documents in the first place.

Speaking of the leaker, Assange has taken to calling Bradley Manning, the prime suspect, a “political prisoner,” leading even some lefties to roll their eyes. Assuming Manning’s the guilty party, it’ll be fun watching him become the new progressive cause celebre even while people like Democrat Chris Carney are demanding that he be tried for treason. Exit question: If a Republican were president, this would officially be the biggest story evah, right? Just checking.