Why do that? Because a $2,000 donation to Habitat for Humanity looks a lot better on a campaign’s tax return than an escrow account filled with boatloads of cash bilked out of innocent people by one of your most trusted bundlers. Understand how odious this is: the Democrats helped make Norman Hsu by accepting the mountains of dough he pushed at them and then studiously avoiding any background check diligent enough to reveal that he’d been a fugitive for more than a decade. They took his money; they posed for pictures with him; in one extreme case, that of Bob Kerrey, they even made him a trustee of the university they oversee. They legitimized him and made it easier for him to move in the circles he moved in. Any investor who had qualms about the suspiciously high returns he promised them could always be shown that photo of him standing side by side with Hillary and her shinola-eating grin. Does that look like a man running a massive Ponzi scheme? (Well, yeah, actually, but only to Republicans.)

So now, having indirectly aided and abetted this turd, they’re going to dump the cash like a hot potato and leave those busted investors to twist. The compassion party:

A lawyer for the biggest victim of Hsu’s alleged Ponzi scheme asked Democratic campaigns to hold Hsu’s contributions in escrow for his client, he told Politico.

“Most of them are either ignoring us or telling us they gave the money back or gave it to charity,” said Ronald Minkoff, a lawyer for Source Financing Investors. Source invested $40 million with Hsu in what its backers believed to be an apparel industry venture…

Minkoff said it was “particularly problematic” to give to a charity money that was stolen, in part, from his client.

He thinks his client “theoretically” has legal grounds to recover the money from campaigns or charities, he said, but the litigation may be too expensive to pursue.

Sue the campaigns. Sue fast, sue long, sue as hard as you can. There’s got to be a tort that’ll cover it. Then ask for punitive damages so they’ll do these background checks the way they’re supposed to, not by weighing the guy’s wallet first.