Is this wine the new frontrunner for the 2024 GOP nomination?

I don’t think it could take Trump in a primary.

But if I were Ron DeSantis, I’d be verrrry nervous about having to face a We The People cabernet head-to-head.

In fact, if I were him I’d hire their ad team. Watch, then read on.

I’m charmed that they chose Reagan rather than Trump as their narrator. Maybe it was a supply issue, as there aren’t a ton of soliloquies about America as eloquent as this in the Trump archives to mine for a voiceover. (Would they owe Trump royalties if they used audio from a speech he delivered publicly as president?) Or maybe it was a marketing choice, recognizing that Reagan is a less divisive figure in 2021 America than Trump is.

Realistically, though, how many non-MAGA wine drinkers are going to try this product? If your consumer base is entirely Trumpist, you might as well Trump it up in your commercials.

“Lotta folks who decry zombie Reaganism love that wine ad,” sniffed my pal Karl of the reaction on conservative Twitter today to the spot. Yeah, Reagan isn’t an entirely comfortable fit for its nationalist theme. He had his nationalist side, of course, but Reagan was a small-government conservative at heart. He wanted to crush statism at home and abroad. Post-Trump Republicans don’t care about the size of government. They want to win the culture war. Some even seem willing to embrace statism in the hope of wielding state power against their cultural enemies.

Why, if they had their way, they may have preferred Viktor Orban as narrator here to the Gipper.

We The People wine is another iteration of the trend lately towards marketing products that have little or nothing to do with partisan politics in explicitly political terms. One comic example was David Hogg and a friend getting together to try to own Mike Lindell earlier this year by starting Good Pillow, a would-be rival to MyPillow. If you’re the sort of lefty for whom boycotting Lindell’s product isn’t enough of a virtue-signal, you can now channel your hard-earned money to a truly progressive manufacturer of head cushions. The Freedom Phone is another recent example, marketed to Trumpers as a $500 “free speech” alternative to products made by Big Tech titans like Google with an “uncensorable” app store. It turns out to be made by a Chinese company called Umidigi and the app store appears to be an open-source client for Google’s Play Store.

Are any of these partisan products any good? Shrug. Maybe? But if they aren’t, does it matter? If you’re the kind of lefty who hates Mike Lindell enough to let your antipathy to him drive you to purchase a woke pillow instead, political validation matters more to you than sleep comfort. If you’re buying the Freedom Phone, lib-owning matters more to you than being on the bleeding edge of tech. Maybe the wine’s good, maybe it isn’t, but the ad is stellar. And that’s all that matters.