One is that his Fire and Fury is laced with errors that reveal that the author, however knowledgeable he is about Manhattan media moguls, doesn’t know much about national politics. Dick Armey was never speaker of the House. Kellyanne Conway was not a down-ballot pollster. Donald Trump was not ignorant of John Boehner’s existence.

Wolff affects a Trump-like insouciance about such inaccuracies. “If it rings true, it is true,” he told NBC News’ Katy Tur. She responded, “Congratulations on the book and congratulations on the president hating it.”

The other reason Wolff’s ambitions may prove to be as unfulfilled as those of the former Trump aide who appears to have been his chief source, Steve Bannon, is that the gist of his indictment — to the extent it’s not fake news — is simply not news. Americans today, like American voters in November 2016, are aware that Trump makes outrageous and inaccurate statements.