Beyond the exhaustion of creativity and grotesque lack of craftsmanship in Disney films, there are also the questions raised by the original Times reporting that led to the boycott in the first place. On a scale of worker-owned fair trade wool cooperative in Vermont to Rockefeller at the height of Standard Oil’s monopoly, Disney is somewhere near the latter end of the corporate wokeness spectrum. It treats its employees at its numerous resorts appallingly and has no qualms about dumping hazardous materials and old gas tanks when it abandons projects; investigations have shown it engages in some very questionable practices when hiring workers for its merchandise factories…

I don’t want to give the impression that Disney has never done anything good. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Fantasia, Bambi, the Southern-fried Robin Hood with Roger Miller, The Great Mouse Detective — these are some of the most charming motion pictures ever made for children. Nor is it Disney’s fault that Star Wars has been ruined by CGI and bad writing, or that comic books are lame and the films adapted from them unwatchable blurs that will entertain mindless fanboys and bored suburbanites but confuse anyone whose taste in action movies was formed by such highbrow fare as Lethal Weapon and Ronin. But the insane hubris and greed of a company that recently withdrew its films from the Netflix catalogue and announced its plans for three separate streaming services — one for classic Disney franchises, one for Marvel, and one for Star Wars — needs to be resisted.