But when a politician talks about other politicians’ homes, he risks inviting voters to think about their homes — the ones they wish they could own, the ones their growing households can’t afford to expand, the ones with mortgages they can’t pay, the ones already in foreclosure. On that last front: Numbers from RealtyTrac, a real estate research firm, identify Illinois as having the nation’s third-highest foreclosure rate in 2013, better only than the rates of real estate basket cases Florida and Nevada. And that metric is moving in the wrong direction: In 2012, Illinois had the nation’s fifth-worst foreclosure rate. …

No matter how much a class warrior wants voters to focus on somebody’s nine homes, many Illinoisans desperately wish they had one home — one home they could afford to buy, to improve, to keep. Except many of those Illinoisans today cannot securely own a home of their own. They lost their jobs, if they ever had decent jobs. They see employers avoiding Illinois. They send endless streams of employment applications into the aloof online void but don’t hear anyone answer, “Congrats, you’re hired.”

Instead they hear a governor who wants to raise the minimum wage here to $10. That would be the nation’s highest state minimum wage, eclipsing Washington ($9.32) and Oregon ($9.10), according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Let’s see: Would that attract more employers to Illinois? Or would that mean even fewer starter jobs in Illinois as employers grow their hiring in any of 49 less expensive states?