Back in New York City, Bloomberg is a staunch defender of the controversial stop-and-frisk policing strategy, which lets officers make warrantless stops of anyone deemed suspicious. The policy came under scrutiny in a federal court last week with supporters – including Bloomberg’s administration – saying it’s helped bring crime down to historic lows, that officers should be able to stop anyone they deem suspicious and that the policy has helped make predominately black and Latino neighborhoods safer. “There is no denying that stops take guns off the street and save lives,” Bloomberg has said.

Opponents of stop-and-frisk, including national and state civil liberties and civil rights groups, criticize the policy as an invasion of privacy or legally sanctioned racial profiling, since the majority of those stopped are black and Latino males. Bloomberg’s staunch defense of stop-and-frisk in the face of such national opposition from the left contrasts with the support he’s getting from similar sectors on the role he’s playing in the gun control debate. …

The soda ban wasn’t beloved by all Democrats or folks on the left, either. Democratic New York Mayoral candidate Christine Quinn doesn’t support the soda ban. “This is what makes liberals look bad. This is what makes liberals look like elitist bullies,” HBO host Bill Maher said on his show.