Unlike a normal foot prosthetic that’s essentially a spring, the BiOM is a machine packed with processors, gyroscopes and motors. It senses how fast the amputee wants to walk or run and then the robot responds like the body — with force. …

He helped build a company called iWalk that employs 60 people and is still ramping up. Some of his early funding came from U.S. military, which invested heavily in robotics — and the BiOM ankle has gone to dozens of veterans who lost their feet in the wars. …

For the users of bionic limbs, the biggest change isn’t technological, it’s profoundly human. Many amputees see the limbs as so functional, they stop seeing themselves as impaired.