He doesn’t have the money or infrastructure to keep up with Mitt Romney in New Hampshire, and he hasn’t been in South Carolina since Nov. 12. A national fundraising surge is imminent — and his name will top the headlines for the next several days — but he’s going to have to dramatically expand his campaign apparatus virtually overnight…

In the short term, Santorum hopes to capitalize on Rick Perry’s decision to head back to Texas to reassess and Michele Bachmann’s decision to cancel plans to campaign in South Carolina Wednesday. His advisers hope Jon Huntsman siphons independent and centrist voters away from Romney. With far less money to compete, Santorum hopes that two debates coming this weekend will give him enough free media to build on post-Iowa momentum…

One major problem: Only 30 percent of likely New Hampshire voters held a favorable view of Santorum while 36 percent said they viewed him unfavorably in a Suffolk poll out last month. Only 4 percent said they had never heard of the former senator, even as 30 percent said they don’t know enough to form a judgment…

“Voters in South Carolina are right in his wheelhouse,” Gregory added. “If they perceive him to have a chance, I think he could siphon off a good many voters from Romney and Gingrich.”

“I don’t see him being able to win, but I see him being able to be a top-three candidate – which would be an achievement considering how much name recognition Romney and Gingrich have,” Gregory said in a phone interview hours before the caucuses started. “Obviously their name recognition is high. Romney’s been here before. If he came out of Iowa strong, I think he would probably be in the top three in South Carolina.”