PALIN RESIGNATION SHOULD BE a major warning to those who, in mind-numbingly unconservative fashion, denigrate the importance of government experience — those like Palin herself, who write that “government experience doesn’t necessarily count for much.”

Frankly, this deification of government inexperience is nutty. An old Latin saying holds much truth: Discimus agere agendo, which means “we learn to do by doing.” Nobody would argue that a 22-year-old right out of engineering school should be the lead designer on a major urban bridge. Nobody would ask a Peyton Manning right out of high school to lead an NFL team into a Super Bowl, the way the experienced Manning twice has done. Nobody would ask a junior member of the diplomatic corps to negotiate directly with Vladimir Putin. So why should anybody in his right mind believe that the mind-bogglingly multi-faceted job of president of the United States — a job involving economics; a massive administrative state; and war, peace, and survival of the very planet in the face of weapons of frightening power — should be handled by somebody whose primary asset is an attitudinal anti-establishmentarianism combined with a virtue uncorrupted but also completely untested by the fires of national politics?…

The problem with Palin is that she’s not ready for the presidency. The promise of Palin is that she has plenty of time to prepare — if, that is, she and her fans will both accept the prudential virtue of patience. Sometimes progress requires a pause. And the perspicacity to use it productively.