That’s what the Seattle PI reports, as filtered past OTB. James Joyner uses the report that Haq was baptized to insist that Haq isn’t a jihadi, or something. My response, which I left in comments there:

Being baptized doesn’t make one a Christian in and of itself. Baptism is an outward symbol of an inner change, and the change isn’t always sincere or longlasting. Since you base part of your argument on that misunderstanding James, the rest of your thinking has fatal cracks. The SPI is making a similar mistake, taking a momentary flirtation with Christianity on Haq’s part to have been an actual conversion that changed his whole life. It obviously didn’t. At best, he seems to have been a “seeker” looking for something to believe in.

The biggest tell with Haq wrt to his faith is what he said before he opened fire: “I am a Muslim American.” His flirtation with Christianity obviously didn’t take.

James and the SPI make a category error: Misunderstanding what makes a Christian a Christian. From that error flows the errant conclusion that Haq was a Christian because he attended a Bible study and got baptized.

The guy identified himself as a Muslim when he opened fire and used that identification to justify his actions, actions which find justification in the Koran but not in the New Testament.

Enough said.

Tags: religion