Actually, that headline’s not fair. It’s different when white people call black women “bitches,” he says. Or rather, it’s different when white men call black women “bitches,” but maybe not when white women do. Or is it? Savor the flavor, my friends, as one of the NBA’s greatest guards sketches out a race/gender matrix so nuanced that only one conclusion may be safely drawn — that for Zeke, as between black men and women, “bitch” is very much on the table.

In a videotaped deposition played for the jury at fired Knicks exec Anucha Browne Sanders’ sexual harassment trial, Thomas said he drew a distinction between whites and blacks when it came to the B-word.

Asked if he was bothered by a black man calling a black female “bitch,” Thomas said: “Not as much. I’m sorry to say, I do make a distinction.

“A white male calling a black female a bitch is highly offensive,” Thomas said. “That would have violated my code of conduct.”

“Maybe I shouldn’t go there. … A white male calling a black female, that is wrong with me. I’m not taking that. I’m not accepting that. … That’s a problem for me.”

Not a problem for Thomas, if his accuser’s to be believed: sentences like “What the f— is your job? What are your job responsibilities, you f—ing ho?” Exit question one: What’s behind his racial distinction here? Righteous, historically based umbrage at the idea of whites denigrating blacks or, rather, a simple observation that whites tend to limit their use of the word “bitch” to when there’s some purposeful animus driving it? And exit question two, for my fellow bloggers: Hey, ever feel like you’re writing the same posts over and over again?