Captain Ed points to an interesting personality profile in the Times of London by the only man known to interview Khaled Sheikh Mohammed. The difference between him and Ramzi Binalshibh, says Yosri Fouda, is that Binalshibh is a religious gangster whereas KSM is a gangster who’s religious.

Reminds me of Zarqawi, or Sadr.

In person he had struck me as shrewd and blunt. A doer, while Ramzi was a thinker. They’d decided to talk to me to mark the first anniversary of 9/11. They showed me a glossy Boeing brochure and manuals, a thick “how to fly” textbook, an air navigation map of the American eastern seaboard, books on how to speak English and flight simulator CD-roms. They gave me details that could be checked.

I think the real father of the 9/11 plot was Muhammed Atef, Osama Bin Laden’s security chief, who was killed in 2001. But it was KSM who made it happen by joining the well resourced Al-Qaeda to carry it out…

He wants to take the credit for high-profile attacks because he is a pragmatist, a power-hungry mastermind, and realises his time is up; he might as well gain sympathy as an ideological hero…

He could be the head of the mafia and also the imam of a group of people praying in Afghanistan. He would enjoy both roles…

He is not a man of Allah but a man of action. I knew that when they were captured it would be KSM who talked first. Ramzi would be much tougher to interrogate: a true believer in Allah, in his own way. I would bet when he was captured Ramzi thought: “My true jihad has just started.” KSM would have thought: “This is it, game over.”

Bet again, pal. According to Brian Ross, Binalshibh cried like a little girl.

Exit question: How many suspected jihadis are going to walk thanks to KSM’s semi-bogus confession?