Matter of time. He used to be commander at the hospital until he was promoted to SG; he was, reportedly, warned numerous times by numerous people about the conditions there; and even if he hadn’t been, he lived right across the street. Then, when the story finally broke, he tried to pass the buck.

And in spite of it all, according to the AP, when it came time for him to go the Secretary of the Army had to demand his retirement request.

Some good’s come out of it, though:

Kiley’s removal underscored how the fallout over Walter Reed’s shoddy conditions has yet to subside. Instead, the controversy has mushroomed into questions about how wounded soldiers and veterans are treated throughout the medical systems run by the military and the Department of Veterans Affairs and has become a major preoccupation of a Bush administration already struggling to defend the unpopular war in Iraq…

Amid the focus on Walter Reed, Veterans Affairs Secretary Jim Nicholson on Monday ordered his department’s clinics to provide details about their physical condition by next week to determine if squalid conditions found at Walter Reed exist elsewhere.

Nicholson has been under pressure to reduce claims backlogs and improve coordination at the VA’s vast network of 1,400 hospitals and clinics, which provide supplemental care and rehabilitation to 5.8 million veterans.