Talk about collusion. Last night the NY Post reported that former NY Governor Eliot Spitzer used to sneak Russian escort Svetlana Travis Zakharova into his apartment in a suitcase.

“He used to sneak me into his Fifth Avenue apartment in a black suitcase . . . when his wife was away,’’ Svetlana Travis Zakharova told The Post in an exclusive interview.

“My knees would be up by my face. When the doorman would ask if he could help, Eliot would say, ‘No, thanks.’ ”

Zakharova revealed the sleazeball sneak tactic — which she said the pair pulled off about 15 times at Eliot and Silda Spitzer’s home — as her lawyer prepared a new push to put the disgraced former pol behind bars.

Spitzer, who became known as Client #9, announced he was resigning from office on March 12, 2008. Svetlana apparently met him in 2010 when he started showing up at a massage parlor where she was working. She claims their relationship about sex from the start:

She said their relationship lasted so long because the pinstripe-loving former politician was a “sexual deviant’’ — and “his wife and other girlfriends wouldn’t do things.

“He complained about [another girlfriend] — he said she was annoying,’’ Zakharova said…

“We were seeing each other four times a week’’ for sex, said Zakharova, who has previously described leading Spitzer around on a black leash during their bedroom games.

She claims Spitzer promised to help her get a green card and an apartment but never did. Their relationship eventually made news when Svetlana called 911 claiming the former governor had attacked her. Here’s a CBS News report from February 2016:

While Spitzer is clearly a creep, it’s worth noting that Svetlana was later arrested for allegedly extorting $400,000 from Spitzer. That case apparently didn’t go anywhere but she did later agree to a plea deal for stealing from another guy. From the NY Post:

As part of the agreement, the Russian vixen didn’t have to admit to squeezing $400,000 from Spitzer by threatening to go public with their affair.

Instead, she copped to the attempted theft from Manhattan toy store owner Paul Nippes in 2014. The plea deal covers the Spitzer case, too.

“You attempted to steal money from someone named Paul Nippes for rent owed by you for an apartment on East 37 Street?” asked Justice Charles Solomon in Manhattan Supreme Court.

“Yes,” she replied through a Russian interpreter.

But her lawyer, Joseph Murray, said she wouldn’t sign off on any deal that required her to admit guilt on the Spitzer-related raps.

This is one of those stories where no one is a reliable narrator and everyone seems to have something to hide.