If Gallup’s latest survey of what issues concern Americans the most is anything to go by, politicians with an eye on the 2020 elections may want to rethink their strategy. In a remarkable flip from only two years ago, the biggest problem on the minds of the voters is the state of their own government. Coming in second – and flying in the face of the DNC’s platform – is immigration. (CNS News)

A new survey shows that the “top problem” cited by Americans is “government,” and the second top problem is “immigration.” For contrast, among the issues seen as least problematic for Americans are “unemployment-jobs” and “gun control/guns.”

In the survey, conducted by Gallup after the midterm elections, the polling firm asked Americans about the country’s top problems and then listed those issues that were “mentioned by at least 3% of respondents.”…

Only 8% of respondents said “unifying the country” was a problem, and only 3% said unemployment-jobs and then gun contol/guns were a problem.

Also, only 5% said “healthcare” was a problem.

The contrast between what Americans are actually worried about and what our politicians are focusing on is, at least in some areas, shocking. On the list of things keeping people awake at night, only two items – the government and immigration – make it into double digits. And those two have reversed position since the election. In November, immigration was number one and the government was number two.

All through the midterms, we were told by Democrats and most of the media that healthcare was the “untold story” and a top concern among voters. They even credited healthcare woes with many of the losses the GOP suffered in the House. But how many Americans cited healthcare as a major concern? 5 percent. That’s the same number that put the environment/pollution as a top concern.

At the bottom of the list? Gun control. It’s funny how Nancy Pelosi listed that as her top priority after taking back the Speaker’s gavel, considering virtually nobody is focusing on it or particularly worried about it.

The economy and unemployment are similarly not of concern to many people, with both also coming in at three percent. That makes sense at a time when we’re basically at full employment levels and are finally starting to see wages rise. Wall Street may be going through some jitters at the moment and possibly be in need of a correction, but the economy underlying it all is still very strong.

So if things are going so well in the minds of most voters, why does the government appear to be such a problem? And what explains the low approval ratings of both the President and Congress? Could it be… (and I’m just spitballing here) that we have too much government? Nah. Perish the thought.