Here’s something fun to bat around while we wait for the election results to come in. When you’re shopping, either in a brick and mortar store or online, is it just too much of a hassle for you to dig out your credit/debit card, swipe it and sign your name or enter your digits on the keyboard? Well, worry no more, citizens. There’s relief for this tedium on the way. For the low, low price of less than 200 bucks, you can have a chip implanted in your hand and just wave at a scanner on your way out of the market. The funds will be withdrawn from your bank account with no muss and no fuss. Of course, the downside is that you’re now technically a cyborg. Oh, and at least for the time being you’ll need to go to Sweden, which may drive up the cost a bit. (Fox News)

You walk into a grocery store and pick up eggs. No smartphone? No problem. You swipe your hand across a reader, and the amount is deducted from your bank account…

If that sounds far-fetched, you obviously haven’t been to Sweden recently, where thousands of people have reportedly had chips implanted in their bodies.

A company called Biohax has already “installed” around 4,000 chips in customers, inserted just below the thumb. They can use the implant to open secure doors, pay for tickets, and share emergency information with medical personnel. The chip is about the size of a Tylenol pill, and the procedure — which costs $180 — is similar to getting a tetanus shot.

“The chip implant is a secure way of ensuring that a person’s digital identity is linked to their physical identity. It enables access management in a way that protects individual self-sovereignty and allows users to control the privacy of their online activity,” Dr. Stewart Southey, the Chief Medical Officer at Biohax International, told Fox News.

It’s not just for shopping, either. You can use the chip in your hand to open up locked security doors at work, set your own home security system or access your account at the ATM. On top of all that, they’re offering to store and regularly update all of your medical information. That way, if you’re in an accident and unconscious, doctors and paramedics can instantly scan you and access information about your blood type, any drug allergies or other conditions you might have.

So with all of the promotional glitz out of the way, allow me to ask the obvious question. I can’t be the only one reading this and getting completely creeped out, right? It’s bad enough that people have already been hacking my Wells Fargo account. Do I really need that much information literally under my thumb and waiting for anyone who strolls past with the right type of reader to just scan it? And if you think nobody is going to hack this biologic network you haven’t been paying attention.

Even if you can get past all of the security concerns, as much as I’ve always been a fan of science fiction I really have zero desire to be a cyborg. How many more additions and substitutions of the robotic kind will we be making to our bodies in the future? I’m pretty sure this is how nearly every dystopian sci-fi movie begins.

Unfortunately, it seems inevitable that the day is coming when this will be commonplace, if not mandatory. I’m just glad I probably won’t live long enough to see it.