No they didn’t, and logic would tell you that even if eyewitnesses who were in the room didn’t. It’s deeply weird that he would mock a political opponent whose career he’d ended in front of his colleagues; that might have been considered poor form even if Sanford were a member of the other party. It’s even weirder that he’d double down on the error in judgment by acknowledging publicly that he did it and insisting that the reaction was positive when there were various reports last night to the contrary.

He’s referring to this account of last night’s meeting with the House GOP on immigration:

Trump hates Sanford because Sanford disdains him but the South Carolinian is respected (especially among his Freedom Caucus colleagues) as a serious fiscal conservative, his embarrassing scandal from years ago aside. Even if he weren’t well-liked, go figure that congressmen wouldn’t warm to the idea of a more powerful politician dunking on the misfortunes of one of their own in front of them. No doubt some feel sympathy for Sanford and privately even agree with his criticism of Trump. Beyond that, vindictiveness is bad optics in politics, even in the moments after a tough election. That’s why most concession speeches are cordial towards the victor. And no member of Congress, particularly a Republican, would want to egg Trump on in the idea that it’s good for him to settle scores with his critics by endorsing their primary opponents. They might be next. They’d want to discourage him from enjoying Sanford’s demise for obvious reasons.

So they did.

Can’t trust a libertarian Trump critic and Sanford pal like Amash, right? Can’t trust those MSM reporters either. Can we trust a guy from Fox News, at least?

It cost him votes. Coincidentally, Freedom Caucus chief Mark Meadows was seen heatedly arguing with Paul Ryan about the GOP’s two immigration bills today, both of which are now reportedly in trouble. The most baffling thing about Trump dunking on Sanders is that, at best, it’s harmless error. He won’t lose any friends in the caucus over it but certainly won’t gain any new ones either. At worst, he’s pissed off enough Freedom Caucusers — normally a friendly group — that his task in getting to 218 going forward will be that much harder. “I was very upset. It was very unnecessary and as far as I’m concerned, it was very rude,” said Walter Jones to the Hill. “To make light of Mark Sanford is very unacceptable.” Terrific.

Here’s the man himself, getting his two cents in.