I consistently enjoy these Campus Reform videos. In the latest one, Students at George Washington University in Washington, DC were asked about the recent Supreme Court decision involving the baker who refused to bake a cake for a gay wedding. As Allahpundit noted here, that decision was made on fairly narrow grounds relating to baker Jack Phillips’ treatment by Colorado’s antidiscrimination commission, but the clip below skips over all of that nuance and gets right to the central question: Should a Christian baker be required to bake a cake for a gay wedding?

You won’t be surprised to learn that nearly all of the students in this man-on-the-street clip thought the baker should be required to bake the cake. From Campus Reform:

“If his job is to bake a cake for a wedding, even if he doesn’t agree with it, he should still have to do it,” said one student.

“His ability to exercise his freedom of religion ends when that infringes on another person’s ability to be who they are,” insisted another.

It’s when the follow up questions are asked that things get interesting. Should a black baker be forced to bake a cake for a KKK rally? Suddenly, the students aren’t so sure. One young woman who was okay with forcing the Christian baker to bake the cake stammers, “Um, well, yeah, no. I mean, like, they shouldn’t but, like, I guess that kind of just, like, contradicts what I just said. Uh, but yeah.”

So, like, there you have it.

As amusing as this clip is, it reinforces the idea that a lot of younger people get their ideas on public issues from very narrow, one-sided sources. Many of these kids knew the politically correct answer but couldn’t explain the logic behind it, probably because they’ve never seen anyone else point out a potential problem with this.

The good news is that some of the students toward the end of the clip had a different point of view. One young woman says the baker could suffer financially, especially if other people in the community don’t like his position, but that it is still his choice. Again, that may not take into account some of the nuance of public accommodation laws but it at least allows for some freedom on the part of the shop owner.

So here’s another good clip from Campus Reform which is more interesting than about 80% of the mainstream media takes on this issue.