We’ve seen some clarifying moments in the media since the Florida school shooting. If nothing else, the secret desires of the gun-grabbing crowd have been exposed as they feel more emboldened by a tide of national outrage. Rather than the usual calls for “sensible gun laws” or more background checks, some have simply come right out and called for the repeal of the Second Amendment. (Which is what a lot of them wanted all along, but were too timid to say it in polite company.) There are petitions popping up online all over the left, including places like MoveOn and Change.org.

Luckily for them, they’re getting some celebrity endorsements for the idea. I noticed one on Twitter last night from none other than singer and actress Alyssa Milano. She was blasting out a virtual poster explaining that the Second Amendment was a dumb idea because of all the other things which were “popular” in the same year that it was adopted.

This is apparently the sort of “thinking” which infects the minds of those who want to end gun rights. Take a look at that list. Certainly there were some ideas baked into the cake of 18th-century society which are abhorrent when viewed in the modern day. Slavery and gender inequality could be considered “popular” ideas for many living in that era. But… lead paint? I don’t know if that was popular so much as simply being the accepted industry standard before anyone had any idea how bad lead is for human beings.

Cholera, smallpox and typhus? Does anyone honestly think those were “popular” in the colonies? “Oh boy, honey. I hear there’s another outbreak of smallpox. I sure hope we get some of that here!

Dying during childbirth? I hate to disillusion Ms. Milano, but that was as much of a tragedy then as it is now. The same goes for unsanitary surgical procedures. Medical science simply hadn’t advanced enough at that point. Nobody was praying for infections and amputations after surgery. And don’t even get me started on chamber pots. If you’d shown any of the colonists an actual modern toilet they would have sold like hotcakes.

Were traveling on foot or on horseback “popular” at that time? Does the former star of Charmed think that the rest of the world was driving cars at that point, but the idiotic settlers in the new world were opposed to them? People walked to get around or, if they were fortunate enough, might have been able to afford a horse.

Milano is supposedly taking some time off from acting so she can travel around the country and lead the way in various activist morangings, raning from #MeToo to repealing the Second Amendment. She’s going to be spending some time in Houston this month doing precisely that. But if this is the leadership that activists settle on, they’ve got a long, uncomfortable slog ahead of them.