To cleanse the palate at the end of a long day. The dumbest part of this is seizing on someone as amazing-looking as Melania Trump as the focal point of the conspiracy. How many Melanias do you think there are walking around who can pinch hit at a moment’s notice? And why would the Trump White House, of all people, need a back-up Melania for photo ops? They’ve already got a shadow First Lady in Ivanka who can sub in as needed.

Then again, if the Beatles could quietly replace Paul McCartney after his untimely death in the 1960s with no one the wiser, how hard would finding a fake Melania be, really?

This idiocy has been percolating online for fully five days now, if you can believe it.

Critics have zeroed in on footage from Friday of the first lady standing beside her husband, President Donald Trump, while he was addressing the media about hurricane relief for Puerto Rico and a nuclear deal with Iran. In the video, the president calls out his wife at the press conference, which conspiracy theorists claim is his effort to cover for the fact that his wife is in fact somewhere else.

“My wife, Melania, who happens to be right here,” he says.

Social media users are studying the image of Melania Trump from the video where she is wearing a coat and sunglasses and are questioning the shape of the first lady’s nose. Since users first posted the footage, Google searches such as “Melania Trump double” and “Fake Melania” have spiked online.

Thirty thousand retweets and counting:

Her nose looks odd because of the way the bridge of her sunglasses is contoured, but … that’s about it as far as evidence of foul play goes. It’s not often you get a dopey Internet conspiracy that can be debunked with literally one photo:

That’s FLOTUS, sans shades, with you know who at the same event in Maryland last Friday at which he gave the presser above. Or does the impostor Melania look even more like the real Melania than we dared dream?

Maybe this new one will hold POTUS’s hand.

Consider this a reminder that all conspiracy theories involving celebrities are false, without exception. Well, one exception: The idea that Taylor Swift is a demon goddess cloned by Satanists to take over the world appears to be legit. But all other celebrity conspiracy theories? Pure garbage.