Just how much enthusiasm will Hillary Clinton backers have for her new “It Was Everyone Else’s Fault But Mine” campaign? Probably few enough that the former Secretary of State could write a new book that throws blame for a potential failure of this current book tour, too. The Hill reports that even her former backers have grown frustrated with her insistence on settling scores, with one unnamed convention surrogate wishing she’d, um … refrain:

Even some of Clinton’s allies have grown weary of her insistence on re-litigating the 2016 campaign at a time when the Democratic Party is looking to forge a new identity in the age of Trump.

“The best thing she could do is disappear,” said one former Clinton fundraiser and surrogate who played an active role at the convention. “She’s doing harm to all of us because of her own selfishness. Honestly, I wish she’d just shut the f— up and go away.” …

“None of this is good for the party,” said one former Obama aide. “It’s the Hillary Show, 100 percent. A lot of us are scratching our heads and wondering what she’s trying to do. It’s certainly not helpful.”

One Democrat went on the record to say he agrees with Hillary, but enough is enough:

And many Democrats agree with Clinton’s reading of the election, even if they’re tired of rehashing it.

“I said in the very beginning of the primary that Bernie Sanders, which he had every right to do, but his run was going to divide us more than unite us,” said Rep. Bill Pascrell (D-N.J.). “And I think I was proven correct. I think she was right substantially about Bernie, but it’s done.”

That doesn’t mean the book won’t succeed, at least in nominal terms. What Happened currently sits at #1 on Amazon for hardcovers five days before its official release, although it’s only #48 on Kindle and #14 on Audible. It’s getting plenty of media play and its allegations generating plenty of debate, which makes Hillary relevant again, if only briefly, for something other than an investigation into her tenure at State. She’s already gotten the cash up front in the advance, so the book sales matter more to Simon & Schuster than they do to Hillary.

And she has her fans, some of whom will go to great lengths to demonstrate loyalty. Politico media critic Jack Shafer gives his take on Verrit, the new media site launched by Hillary apologist Peter Daou to cater to just those who voted for Hillary in 2016. Shafer notes that the critics have been unanimous in condemning Verrit, and then agrees with them in his usual, colorful style:

The derision greeting Verrit is so universal it inspires sympathy for Daou, as Gizmodo, the Washington PostOutlineNew RepublicNew YorkThe Ringer and others have broken its back with their snap judgments. “Verrit, a Media Company for Almost Nobody,” read one headline. “No One Asked for Verrit, But Here We Are,” stated another. “What Is Verrit and Why Should I Care? (Unclear; You Shouldn’t.),” said a third. “Peter Daou Continues to Embarrass Hillary Clinton,” asserted the best in show. …

As Daou’s Verrit manifesto puts it, the site hopes to become the trusted sourced [sic] for the 65.8 million voters who cast their ballots last November for Clinton and who seek verified “facts” they can use to argue politics. In theory, everybody needs a cheat sheet. In practice, the Verrit method is cringe-worthy. The headline to one early Verrit borrows from the literary methods of Kim Jong Un’s North Korea to assert, “Hillary Democrats Are the Heart and Conscience of America.” Does anybody outside of the Daou re-education camp really think this way?

When it comes to criticism, Daou isn’t a just snowflake. He’s a snow squall, equating most criticism of Clinton (or criticism of Daou) with the desire to erase Clinton and Clintonites. Early this year, he telegraphed his irrational partisanship by tweeting that anybody tweeting “Bernie would have won” in his timeline would earn “an instant block” from his account. “Useless and baseless conjecture. Betrays someone unfocused on the challenge ahead,” Daou continued.

His is a reductionist world where evidence of misogyny and sexism can be deduced from almost any political discussion of Madame Secretary.

From a marketing perspective, it’s a curious decision to open a store that sells an exhausted product to a saturated market. The book will have the same problem; Hillary’s selling all of the same excuses that she and her apologists have been giving away for free since November 9th. Everyone else has moved on, and even those who might have been sympathetic to these arguments months ago have grown weary of hearing about it now.

Rather than “Fight Song,” these former supporters might suggest a new theme song for Hillary’s latest campaign. At least it puts the message in somewhat kinder terms than her surrogate did with The Hill.