What a shame that it was a Republican press secretary who made this (very dry) joke. Infowars would have wrung a week’s worth of “Illuminati” content out of it if it had come from Josh Earnest.

Was “covfefe” a simple typo, as the rest of the world believes, or, as I believe, was it actually the go word for SEAL Team 6 to seize North Korea’s nuclear facilities? Stay tuned, my friends.

“Do you think people should be concerned that the president posted somewhat of an incoherent tweet last night, and that it then stayed up for hours?” a reporter asked.

“Uh, no,” Spicer said.

“Why did it stay up so long? Is no one watching this?” the reporter asked.

“No, I think the president and a small group of people know exactly what he meant,” Spicer said.

Listen to the clip to see how deadpan he is. That’s proof that (a) Spicer’s funnier than people realize and (b) he’s so, so done caring about this job that he’s going to clown on the press from now on whenever an opportunity arises. Maybe that missed audience with the Pope finally broke him. Or maybe he’s just tired of trying to spin Trump’s unspinnable Twitter habit and has decided to roll with it. “Covfefe”? Total code word, bro. He’s playing eight-dimensional chess when the average person can’t even see the board.

And believe it or not, some political reporters sort of agree. There really are semi-serious covfefe “takes” floating around today. It may well be the defining moment of media in the age of Trump — a typo by the president while farting around late at night on his iPhone becomes the top political story in America today. If there’s a true meaning of the word, that’s it. It’s Trump’s ability to control the news cycle at whim, via the most trivial nonsense, synthesized in seven letters. I’d high-five him if it was a deliberate goof just to test how long the chatterati would keep buzzing about it.