Fox News is reporting that the man who is a suspect to be responsible for the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry has been arrested in Mexico:

The cartel member suspected of shooting and killing Border Patrol agent Brian Terry in 2010 with a gun supplied by the U.S. government was arrested in Mexico Wednesday, senior law enforcement, Border Patrol, and congressional sources told Fox News.

The suspect, Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes, was apprehended by a joint U.S.-Mexico law enforcement task force that included the Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Marshals and the Border Patrol Tactical Unit (BORTAC).

Terry was killed in 2010 during a shootout between border patrol agents and a group of five thieves looking for drug dealers to rob. Four of the thieves have previously been arrested and tried for their involvement. In 2014, Manuel Osorio-Arellanes was given 30 years for his involvement. From CNN:

Osorio-Arellanes admitted that on the night of December 14, 2010, he and four others were looking for drug traffickers to rob of marijuana…

In his plea agreement, Osorio-Arellanes agreed the shot that killed Terry was fired by a member of his group, although he did not claim to have personally fired the shot or blame someone else specifically for the crime.

The incident became major news after two of the guns found at the scene were discovered to be part of the ATF’s Fast and Furious operation. Fast and Furious allowed buyers to purchase thousands of guns in the U.S. and then smuggle them across the border. The ATF lost track of most of the guns, some of which wound up being used in crimes by cartel members.

The story became a political scandal that went on for more than a year. Attorney General Holder testified he had only learned of the program in 2011, but memos mentioning the program had been sent to him months earlier. Holder was eventually held in contempt of Congress for refusing to turn over documents sought by Congress.

President Obama claimed executive privilege over Fast and Furious documents and the issue continued until early 2016 when a judge rejected the executive privilege claim on grounds that much of the information was already in the public domain. Our own Jazz Shaw wrote about another development in the case last May.

Here’s a flashback to some coverage of the scandal as it was developing in late 2011: