And so the Democratic civil war comes to an end, in Bernie Sanders’ political backyard. Hardest hit: The Green Party, which made a belated pitch to woo Bernie late last week. Instead, the runner-up in the primary will officially endorse Hillary Clinton tomorrow, according to the Associated Press:

Hillary Clinton’s campaign is making it official: Former Democratic rival Bernie Sanders will join her at a New Hampshire event on Tuesday where he plans to endorse her.

Clinton’s campaign is holding the event at a high school in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Sanders defeated Clinton by a wide margin in New Hampshire, in the nation’s first primary.

Sanders’ endorsement will come a month after the final primary. He’s pushed for policy agreements on higher education, health care and a $15 an hour federal minimum wage. Some of those policies were included in a draft of the party’s platform in Orlando, Florida, over the weekend.

Some of them got into the party platform draft, but not all — and it’s not certain that they’ll survive the convention, either. Even if they do, so what? A lot of ink and pixels get spilled on party platforms, but they aren’t binding, and Sanders knows it. They’re kinda-sorta useful tools for accountability in a theoretical sense, but practically speaking they serve only to acknowledge the activists in the ranks. The presidential candidates put together their own sets of policies, and a nomination eclipses the platform within hours of its approval.

Sanders’ supporters aren’t all fooled, particularly about the platform on trade:

Climate change, health care and a minimum wage hike are among the issues that the Sanders campaign are calling victories.

However, some of Sanders’ supporters are still critical of this upcoming endorsement, particularly over the party platform’s language on trade.

John King notes this but still calls the endorsement “a page turner”:

Sanders will have three more weeks of political significance, then return to his accustomed role of back-bench crank. Hillary will get the unity-fest she badly needs in Philadelphia, and the inside track to return to the White House. So far, July’s working out to be one of her best months of the campaign … in a cycle that Republicans had every opportunity to win.