It’s become standard Clintonista patter to react to scandals involving Bill and Hillary to tell critics to “move on.” In fact, a group of supporters named their Clinton-apologist organization for the clichéd riposte, and still operate to this day. For Dorothy Woods, the widow of fallen Benghazi hero Tyrone Woods, Hillary Clinton’s use of this verbal tic was not just cliché, but a personal affront. “She has no right,” Woods told CNN’s Erin Burnett last night, “to tell me it’s time to ‘move on’.”

Dorothy Woods, the widow of Navy SEAL Tyrone Woods, told CNN’s Erin Burnett in her first interview since the attacks that she found Clinton’s comments to be in sync with other “dismissive” remarks from critics of the Benghazi investigation. The probe has been slammed by Democrats as partisan and more focused on harming Clinton than on finding out the truth about the September 11, 2012, attack.

“Nobody in government can tell me how I feel, what I should feel about it,” Woods said. “She has no right — nor does anyone in government have the right — to tell me it’s time to move on. They’re not in my shoes.”

Hillary’s been telling people to “move on” in one form or another since January 2013. Recall this exchange with Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI)?

What difference, at this point, does it make? This was just a longer version of “move on,” with an added serving of “let’s discuss security budgets and just chalk this one up.”

Woods doesn’t think the Select Committee report changes much, though. She reached her own conclusions long before this, and now challenges the American people to do the same. The problem with Hillary and others involved in the debacle of Benghazi and Libya is that they just don’t care at all, except to the extent that the deaths of her husband and the other three people might impact “the next job,” a clear shot at Hillary’s presidential aspirations:

Woods said she had come to her own conclusions and the report “doesn’t change anything.”

“It did not change my view of what happened, nor who to blame,” she said. “I place a blame on this sentiment, on this attitude in the upper level of government that says, ‘Hey, you know what, I’m just gonna lie about this, gloss over it, because I want to protect what I look like, and I’m thinking about the next job.'”

I’d say that Dorothy Woods’ conclusions look … pretty solid.