Last month, when the upcoming Brexit vote in the UK was already tightening, I noted that former London Mayor Boris Johnson had become one of the more boisterous voices in favor of the Brits parting ways with the EU. At the time, I pondered whether he might not be quite ready for retirement and eyeing a more high profile position.

Cameron’s popularity is taking some hits over this subject and he’s being regularly attacked over it by former London Mayor Boris Johnson, a vocal Brexit supporter. Is this a bid by Johnson to move into a national leadership role now that his old job is finished? If so, you can bet he’ll be pushing a bit more of a secure borders agenda and not trying to keep the UK in the European Union.

It turns out I wasn’t the only one thinking along those lines. With Brexit surging in the polls and even the most optimistic Bremain supporters looking nervous, the oddsmakers in England are seeing David Cameron’s position as Prime Minister in jeopardy, with some estimating that his time in office may be down to as little as two weeks. And if Cameron were to pack his bags and leave 10 Downing Street, who would be best positioned to replace him? (Express.co.uk)

With just a week until the EU referendum, the under-fire Tory leader is priced at 5/2 to leave Downing Street before the end of June.

William Hill has also cut its odds on George Osborne to cease to be Chancellor by the end of this year – from 7/4 to 5/4.

It comes after 65 Tory MPs vowed to vote against Osborne’s proposed “emergency Budget” of swingeing cuts in the event of Brexit.

Vote Leave campaigner and ex-London mayor Boris Johnson is 5/2 favourite to replace Mr Cameron while Mr Osborne is priced at 9/2.

Pro-EU Home Secretary Theresa May and Michael Gove, who made the case for Brexit in a Question Time debate last night, are both 6/1.

Johnson is a charismatic figure who never failed to generate controversy, but if he does wind up being the Prime Minister you can bet that there will be a more “Britain First” tone to the government and a crackdown on both illegal immigration and migrant absorption. I also have no doubt that he’ll be making the news on a regular basis for his colorful quotes. Boris may not be in the same class as Churchill when it comes to memorable zingers, but he certainly has his moments. In fact, a couple of years ago he was asked about his chances of one day being Prime Minister as well as why he originally supported Cameron, and this was the response. It might have been a bit of foreshadowing.

On becoming Prime Minister:
“My chances of being PM are about as good as the chances of finding Elvis on Mars, or my being reincarnated as an olive.”

On why he voted for David Cameron:
“I’m backing David Cameron’s campaign out of pure, cynical self-interest.”

Just to give you a sense of what we might be in store for, here are a few of his other greatest hits.

On cake:
“My policy on cake is pro having it and pro eating it.”

On how to vote:
“Voting Tory will cause your wife to have bigger breasts and increase your chances of owning a BMW M3.”

On the Lib Dems:
“The Lib Dems are not just empty. They are a void within a vacuum surrounded by a vast inanition.”

On drugs:
“I think I was once given cocaine but I sneezed so it didn’t go up my nose. In fact, it may have been icing sugar.”

In yet another parallel to what’s going on in the United States right now, we may indeed have lived to see interesting times. If Boris Johnson is the next Prime Minster in a post-Brexit Great Britain, his first meeting with the next United States President could be one for the history books.

BorisJohnson