“Neither you nor President Obama have endorsed yet,” George Stephanopoulos said to Nancy Pelosi this morning after leading into the interview with the AP’s call of the Democratic nomination for Hillary Clinton. “Are you prepared now to embrace Hillary Clinton as your party’s nominee?” It’s an odd question; a better one might have been Why has it taken you this long to make up your mind? And even while claiming to be “proud” to endorse Hillary, Pelosi insists that the race actually isn’t quite over yet:

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi endorsed Hillary Clinton for president this morning on “Good Morning America” before her home state’s primary today.

“I’m a voter in California and I have voted for Hillary Clinton for president of the United States and proud to endorse her for that position,” the Democratic superdelegate said.

Yes, but then Pelosi added, “I hasten to say that it’s not over ’til it’s over.” Er … isn’t that a bit off message for Hillary endorsers? It’s over, at least in terms of delegate counts and mathematics, and it has been over for weeks on that basis. The AP’s call last night is at best a pre-formality. Almost 700 delegates are up for grabs tonight, including 425 from California, and Hillary only needed 29 of them from the proportional allocation that will take place. Unless she couldn’t break 3% in all five primaries combined, it’s over.

It also raises the question of why Pelosi took this long to endorse her. Most politicians don’t get around to endorsing until their state primary, but Pelosi is the leader of House Democrats and a former Speaker, not to mention a superdelegate. She has stood alone among her party’s leadership in not taking a stand for either Hillary or Bernie Sanders until now. Why? And why offer the Yogi Berra-ism as a caveat? Pelosi may claim pride in this now-meaningless endorsement, but her actions reveal a curious lack of enthusiasm.